Wine Soap Project

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Skill Level: Intermediate
Time: 2 hours
Yield: About 2 pounds of soap

Project Description

This project is made with wine from Washington state. It gives the soap a rich color and amazing lather.

Although Napa Valley in California is known for wine, Washington state is the 2nd largest producer in the United States. Most of it is from Eastern Washington, where temperatures are warmer. To highlight this ingredient in our local area, the water in this recipe is swapped for local wine.

Working with wine in soap is not difficult, but it does require some extra prep work. The liquid needs to be boiled first to remove the majority of the alcohol. Then, we like to freeze the liquid before adding the lye. That helps prevent scorching, which in turn prevents darker discoloration and an unpleasant smell. 

The red wine gives the soap a dark tan color. Titanium Dioxide Pigment combats this a bit, creating a creamier color. A combination of Queen's Purple Mica and Merlot Sparkle Mica create a rich burgundy-wine color. Raspberry Jam Fragrance Oil gives the soap a realistic and slightly fruity scent.

Additional Information

  • Supplies
  • Instructions
  • Reviews
  • Q&A

Supplies

6 Ingredients
1 Tools
For All 7 Items
We do our best to include just what you need to make your project, however due to available product sizes, you may have left overs.
All 7 Items :
Swirl Recipe Quick Mix - 33 oz
Swirl Recipe Quick Mix - 33 oz Item#: M900017
$16.99

$16.99
Sodium Hydroxide Lye
Sodium Hydroxide Lye Item#: IB002149
$11.99

$11.99
Titanium Dioxide Pigment - 1 oz
Titanium Dioxide Pigment - 1 oz Item#: IB002531
$3.00

$3.00
Queen's Purple Mica - 1 oz
Queen's Purple Mica - 1 oz Item#: IB002212
$3.25

$3.25
Merlot Sparkle Mica - 1 oz
Merlot Sparkle Mica - 1 oz Item#: IB002170
$3.25

$3.25
Raspberry Jam Fragrance Oil - 1.75 oz
Raspberry Jam Fragrance Oil - 1.75 oz Item#: IB000505
$6.78

$6.78
Silicone Column Mold
Silicone Column Mold Item#: IB002857
$21.49
Get 5 or More and Save 10%!

$21.49

Instructions

Wine Soap Project

  • Skill Level: Intermediate
  • Time: 2 hours
  • Yield: About 2 pounds of soap

Although Napa Valley in California is known for wine, Washington state is the 2nd largest producer in the United States. Most of it is from Eastern Washington, where temperatures are warmer. To highlight this ingredient in our local area, the water in this recipe is swapped for local wine.

Working with wine in soap is not difficult, but it does require some extra prep work. The liquid needs to be boiled first to remove the majority of the alcohol. Then, we like to freeze the liquid before adding the lye. That helps prevent scorching, which in turn prevents darker discoloration and an unpleasant smell. 

The red wine gives the soap a dark tan color. Titanium Dioxide Pigment combats this a bit, creating a creamier color. A combination of Queen's Purple Mica and Merlot Sparkle Mica create a rich burgundy-wine color. Raspberry Jam Fragrance Oil gives the soap a realistic and slightly fruity scent.

You will need:

  • Silicone Column Mold
  • 25 oz. Swirl Quick Mix
  • 7.4 oz. Prepped Wine (10% water discount)
  • 3.5 oz. Sodium Hydroxide Lye
  • 1.5 oz. Raspberry Jam Fragrance Oil
  • Titanium Dioxide
  • Queen’s Purple Mica
  • Merlot Sparkle Mica

Follow these steps:

1

Fully melt the entire bag of Swirl Quick Mix until it's completely clear and there is no cloudiness. Shake the bag to mix up all the oils. Measure 25 oz. into a large heat-safe container. Add 2 tablespoons of the dispersed titanium dioxide and stick blend until combined. 

2

Add the lye water to the oils and stick blend until thin trace. Notice the color change of the soap!

3

Split the batch in half. Each container should have about 500 mL of soap. To one container, add all the dispersed Merlot Sparkle Mica and all the dispersed Queen’s Purple Mica. To the other container of soap, add the remaining dispersed titanium dioxide. Use a whisk to thoroughly mix.

4

Add half of the Raspberry Jam Fragrance Oil to one container of soap, and the other half of the fragrance oil to the other container (it’s okay to eyeball it). Use a whisk to thoroughly mix.

5

Pour some of tan soap into the mold, while counting to “1, 2, 3.” Then, pour the wine colored soap into the cream, directly in the center of the mold while counting to “1, 2, 3.” Counting helps keep the pours consistent. The colors should break through to the layer below.

6

Continue pouring each color into the mold, directly in the center, until the mold is completely full.

7

While firmly holding on to the seals on the sides of the mold, very lightly tap the mold on the counter. Don’t tap too firmly, or the seal of the mold can unlock and your soap will spill everywhere. Set the mold aside in a safe area where it will not topple over.

Because of the extra sugar in the wine, this soap does have a tendency to warm up. Our space was cool, so we left the soap at room temperature for 3-4 days before unmolding. If you live in a hot climate, you may want to place the soap into the fridge for the first 3-4 hours to prevent overheating. Allow the soap to stay in the mold for 3-4 days. Because of the amount of colorant/extra oil in the recipe, we found it took a little longer to unmold. Once unmolded, slice into bars and allow to cure for 4-6 weeks. Enjoy!

Tutorial credits

Photographer: Amanda Kerzman

Wine Soap Project

  • Skill Level: Intermediate
  • Time: 2 hours
  • Yield: About 2 pounds of soap

Although Napa Valley in California is known for wine, Washington state is the 2nd largest producer in the United States. Most of it is from Eastern Washington, where temperatures are warmer. To highlight this ingredient in our local area, the water in this recipe is swapped for local wine.

Working with wine in soap is not difficult, but it does require some extra prep work. The liquid needs to be boiled first to remove the majority of the alcohol. Then, we like to freeze the liquid before adding the lye. That helps prevent scorching, which in turn prevents darker discoloration and an unpleasant smell. 

The red wine gives the soap a dark tan color. Titanium Dioxide Pigment combats this a bit, creating a creamier color. A combination of Queen's Purple Mica and Merlot Sparkle Mica create a rich burgundy-wine color. Raspberry Jam Fragrance Oil gives the soap a realistic and slightly fruity scent.

You will need:

  • Silicone Column Mold
  • 25 oz. Swirl Quick Mix
  • 7.4 oz. Prepped Wine (10% water discount)
  • 3.5 oz. Sodium Hydroxide Lye
  • 1.5 oz. Raspberry Jam Fragrance Oil
  • Titanium Dioxide
  • Queen’s Purple Mica
  • Merlot Sparkle Mica

Follow these steps:

1

Fully melt the entire bag of Swirl Quick Mix until it's completely clear and there is no cloudiness. Shake the bag to mix up all the oils. Measure 25 oz. into a large heat-safe container. Add 2 tablespoons of the dispersed titanium dioxide and stick blend until combined. 

2

Add the lye water to the oils and stick blend until thin trace. Notice the color change of the soap!

3

Split the batch in half. Each container should have about 500 mL of soap. To one container, add all the dispersed Merlot Sparkle Mica and all the dispersed Queen’s Purple Mica. To the other container of soap, add the remaining dispersed titanium dioxide. Use a whisk to thoroughly mix.

4

Add half of the Raspberry Jam Fragrance Oil to one container of soap, and the other half of the fragrance oil to the other container (it’s okay to eyeball it). Use a whisk to thoroughly mix.

5

Pour some of tan soap into the mold, while counting to “1, 2, 3.” Then, pour the wine colored soap into the cream, directly in the center of the mold while counting to “1, 2, 3.” Counting helps keep the pours consistent. The colors should break through to the layer below.

6

Continue pouring each color into the mold, directly in the center, until the mold is completely full.

7

While firmly holding on to the seals on the sides of the mold, very lightly tap the mold on the counter. Don’t tap too firmly, or the seal of the mold can unlock and your soap will spill everywhere. Set the mold aside in a safe area where it will not topple over.

Because of the extra sugar in the wine, this soap does have a tendency to warm up. Our space was cool, so we left the soap at room temperature for 3-4 days before unmolding. If you live in a hot climate, you may want to place the soap into the fridge for the first 3-4 hours to prevent overheating. Allow the soap to stay in the mold for 3-4 days. Because of the amount of colorant/extra oil in the recipe, we found it took a little longer to unmold. Once unmolded, slice into bars and allow to cure for 4-6 weeks. Enjoy!

Tutorial credits

Photographer: Amanda Kerzman

You will need:

  • Silicone Column Mold
  • 25 oz. Swirl Quick Mix
  • 7.4 oz. Prepped Wine (10% water discount)
  • 3.5 oz. Sodium Hydroxide Lye
  • 1.5 oz. Raspberry Jam Fragrance Oil
  • Titanium Dioxide
  • Queen’s Purple Mica
  • Merlot Sparkle Mica

Follow these steps:

1

Fully melt the entire bag of Swirl Quick Mix until it's completely clear and there is no cloudiness. Shake the bag to mix up all the oils. Measure 25 oz. into a large heat-safe container. Add 2 tablespoons of the dispersed titanium dioxide and stick blend until combined. 

2

Add the lye water to the oils and stick blend until thin trace. Notice the color change of the soap!

3

Split the batch in half. Each container should have about 500 mL of soap. To one container, add all the dispersed Merlot Sparkle Mica and all the dispersed Queen’s Purple Mica. To the other container of soap, add the remaining dispersed titanium dioxide. Use a whisk to thoroughly mix.

4

Add half of the Raspberry Jam Fragrance Oil to one container of soap, and the other half of the fragrance oil to the other container (it’s okay to eyeball it). Use a whisk to thoroughly mix.

5

Pour some of tan soap into the mold, while counting to “1, 2, 3.” Then, pour the wine colored soap into the cream, directly in the center of the mold while counting to “1, 2, 3.” Counting helps keep the pours consistent. The colors should break through to the layer below.

6

Continue pouring each color into the mold, directly in the center, until the mold is completely full.

7

While firmly holding on to the seals on the sides of the mold, very lightly tap the mold on the counter. Don’t tap too firmly, or the seal of the mold can unlock and your soap will spill everywhere. Set the mold aside in a safe area where it will not topple over.

Because of the extra sugar in the wine, this soap does have a tendency to warm up. Our space was cool, so we left the soap at room temperature for 3-4 days before unmolding. If you live in a hot climate, you may want to place the soap into the fridge for the first 3-4 hours to prevent overheating. Allow the soap to stay in the mold for 3-4 days. Because of the amount of colorant/extra oil in the recipe, we found it took a little longer to unmold. Once unmolded, slice into bars and allow to cure for 4-6 weeks. Enjoy!

Tutorial credits

Photographer: Amanda Kerzman

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