Sushi Soap Project

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Skill Level: Advanced
Yield: About 2 pounds of soap

Project Description

The Bramble Berry studio has several sushi addicts. While brainstorming new project ideas, we kept going back to recreating a classic sushi roll with cold process soap. We’re thrilled with how this soap turned out.

This project is not for the faint of heart. It’s not particularly difficult, but it does take several batches of soap and a few days to complete. First, several column embeds are created to look like sushi fillings. We used White Melt and Pour Soap Base and Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base to expedite the process, but the embeds can also be made with cold process soap. 

Once the embeds are cool and hard, they are cut into random shapes. The exact shape doesn’t really matter, but they look more natural than a perfect square. For our first attempt at this project, we used a mixture of fresh cold process batter and finely chopped white cold process soap to create a rice texture.

The embeds are inserted into the Mini Star Silicone Column Mold, and white soap is poured around them. After about 1-2 days, the soap can be removed from the mold and cut into different shapes.

The final step is painting cold process soap on the outside of the soap. We used a shaving brush for this step, but any large fluffy paint brush will do the trick. We experimented with painting the entire batch first then cutting, as well as painting the individual bars. We found painting the individual bars a little bit easier – the outer layer tended to crack when we cut the soap after.

It’s a fairly complicated project but we think it’s worth it. We think they’ll be a hit at markets – they’re a great conversation piece. They would also be the perfect gift for any sushi enthusiast in your life.

Additional Information

  • Supplies
  • Instructions
  • Reviews
  • Q&A

Supplies

17 Ingredients
2 Tools
For All 19 Items
We do our best to include just what you need to make your project, however due to available product sizes, you may have left overs.
All 19 Items :
SFIC LCP White Melt And Pour Soap Base - 1 lb
SFIC LCP White Melt And Pour Soap Base - 1 lb Item#: IB002886
$4.39

$4.39
SFIC LCP Clear Melt And Pour Soap Base - 1 lb
SFIC LCP Clear Melt And Pour Soap Base - 1 lb Item#: IB002898
$4.39

$4.39
Coconut Oil - 1 lb
Coconut Oil - 1 lb Item#: IB002326
$4.79

$4.79
Rice Bran Oil - 1 lb
Rice Bran Oil - 1 lb Item#: IB002373
$3.99

$3.99
Sodium Hydroxide Lye
Sodium Hydroxide Lye Item#: IB002149
$11.99

$11.99
Black Oxide Pigment - 1 oz
Black Oxide Pigment - 1 oz Item#: IB002545
$3.25

$3.25
Green Chrome Color Block - 1 Block
Green Chrome Color Block - 1 Block Item#: M900065
$1.99
Get 4 or More and Save 10%

$1.99
Fizzy Lemonade Color Block - 1 Block
Fizzy Lemonade Color Block - 1 Block Item#: M900081
$1.99
Get 4 or More and Save 10%

$1.99
Perfect Orange Color Block - 1 Block
Perfect Orange Color Block - 1 Block Item#: M900087
$1.99
Get 4 or More and Save 10%

$1.99
Fired Up Fuchsia Color Block - 1 Block
Fired Up Fuchsia Color Block - 1 Block Item#: M900085
$1.99
Get 4 or More and Save 10%

$1.99
Merlot Sparkle Color Block - 1 Block
Merlot Sparkle Color Block - 1 Block Item#: M900055
$1.99
Get 4 or More and Save 10%

$1.99
Sweet Almond Oil - 1 lb
Sweet Almond Oil - 1 lb Item#: IB002355
$7.59

$7.59
Shea Butter - 1 lb
Shea Butter - 1 lb Item#: IB002473
$7.99

$7.99
Titanium Dioxide Pigment - 1 oz
Titanium Dioxide Pigment - 1 oz Item#: IB002531
$3.00

$3.00
Fresh Bamboo Fragrance Oil - 1.75 oz
Fresh Bamboo Fragrance Oil - 1.75 oz Item#: IB001596
$5.27

$5.27
Palm Oil - 1 lb
Palm Oil - 1 lb Item#: IB002379
$3.69

$3.69
Green Chrome Oxide Pigment - 1 oz
Green Chrome Oxide Pigment - 1 oz Item#: IB002537
$4.79

$4.79
Silicone Column Mold
Silicone Column Mold Item#: IB002857
$21.49
Get 5 or More and Save 10%!

$21.49
Mini Star Silicone Column Mold
Mini Star Silicone Column Mold Item#: IB002815
$13.49
Get 5 or More and Save 10%!

$13.49

Instructions

Sushi Soap Project

  • Skill Level: Advanced
  • Time:
  • Yield: About 2 pounds of soap

This project is not for the faint of heart. It’s not particularly difficult, but it does take several batches of soap and a few days to complete. First, several column embeds are created to look like sushi fillings. We used White Melt and Pour Soap Base and Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base to expedite the process, but the embeds can also be made with cold process soap. 

Once the embeds are cool and hard, they are cut into random shapes. The exact shape doesn’t really matter, but they look more natural than a perfect square. For our first attempt at this project, we used a mixture of fresh cold process batter and finely chopped white cold process soap to create a rice texture.

The embeds are inserted into the Mini Star Silicone Column Mold, and white soap is poured around them. After about 1-2 days, the soap can be removed from the mold and cut into different shapes.

The final step is painting cold process soap on the outside of the soap. We used a shaving brush for this step, but any large fluffy paint brush will do the trick. We experimented with painting the entire batch first then cutting, as well as painting the individual bars. We found painting the individual bars a little bit easier – the outer layer tended to crack when we cut the soap after.

It’s a fairly complicated project but we think it’s worth it. We think they’ll be a hit at markets – they’re a great conversation piece. They would also be the perfect gift for any sushi enthusiast in your life.

You will need:

  • Sushi Embeds:
  • our Mini Star Silicone Column Molds
  • 5 oz. LCP White Melt and Pour Soap Base
  • Chrome Green Color Block
  • 11 oz. LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base
  • Chrome Green Color Block
  • Fizzy Lemonade Color Block
  • Perfect Orange Color Block
  • Fired Up Fuchsia Color Block
  • Shimmer Merlot Sparkle Color Block
  • Sushi Base:
  • Silicone Column Mold
  • 6 oz. Coconut Oil (30%)
  • 6 oz. Palm Oil (30%)
  • 4 oz. Rice Bran Oil (20%)
  • 1 oz. Shea Butter (5%)
  • 3 oz. Sweet Almond Oil (15%)
  • 6 oz. Distilled Water
  • 2.8 oz. Sodium Hydroxide Lye
  • 1 oz. Fresh Bamboo Fragrance Oil
  • Titanium Dioxide

  • Sushi Outer Layer:
  • 2.1 oz. Coconut Oil (30%)
  • 2.1 oz. Palm Oil (30%)
  • 1.4 oz. Rice Bran Oil (20%)
  • 0.4 oz. Shea Butter (5%)
  • 1.1 oz. Sweet Almond Oil (15%)
  • 1 oz. Sodium Hydroxide Lye
  • Green Chrome Oxide Pigment
  • Black Oxide Pigment
  • Optional: Shaving Brush

Follow these steps:

MAKE THE EMBEDS

1

Chop 11 ounces of LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base into small uniform pieces. Then, chop 5 ounces of LCP White Melt and Pour Soap Base into small uniform pieces. Add the following amounts of soap base and color blocks to separate heat-safe containers. Melt the soap and color blocks in the microwave separately using 10-20 second bursts.
NOTE: If you have fewer than 4 Mini Square Silicone Column Molds, you’ll need to make the embeds in batches. 

  • Salmon Embed: 3.5 oz. LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base + 0.5 oz. LCP White Soap Base + equal amounts of Perfect Orange Color Block, Fired Up Fuchsia Color Block, and Fizzy Lemonade Color Block + a very small shaving of Shimmer Merlot Sparkle Color Block
  • Orange Embed: 4 oz. LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base + Perfect Orange Color Block shavings
  • Green Embed: 3.5 oz. LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base + 0.5 oz. LCP White Soap Base + equal amounts of Fizzy Lemonade Color Block and Chrome Green Color Block shavings
  • Light Green Embed: 4 oz. LCP White Melt and Pour Soap Base + equal amounts of Fizzy Lemonade Color Block and Chrome Green Color Block shavings

2

After melting one container of soap, immediately pour it into one of the Mini Square Silicone Column Molds. Place the mold into a sturdy and tall container to make sure it stays upright and the soap doesn’t pour out. Repeat until you’ve created all 4 embeds (green, light green, salmon, and orange). Allow the embeds to fully harden and cool for several hours.

3

Remove the embeds from the molds. Trim the sides to create triangles leaving a square center – we like using a Clean Up Tool. Use a sharp, non-serrated knife to cut the corners off the embeds as you see fit. We cut one corner off both green embeds and the salmon embed. Then we cut the orange embed into four equal pieces to look like carrots. Don’t worry too much about how you cut the embeds – the key is not keeping them perfect. Set aside to prep the base.

MAKE THE SUSHI BASE

1

Slowly and carefully add 2.8 ounces of lye to 6 ounces of water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool. If you’d like a harder bar of soap that releases faster from the mold, you can add sodium lactate to the cooled lye water. Use 1 teaspoon of sodium lactate per pound of oils in the recipe. For this recipe, you’d add 1 teaspoon sodium lactate.

2

In a large glass bowl, combine and melt 6 ounces of coconut oil, 4 ounces of rice bran oil, 1 ounce of shea butter, 3 ounces of sweet almond oil, and 6 ounces of palm oil (remember to fully melt then mix your entire container of palm oil before portioning). Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130° F or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend the mixture to a thin trace.

3

Add all of the dispersed titanium dioxide, and use the stick blender to mix in thoroughly.

4

Add the 1 ounce of Fresh Bamboo Fragrance Oil. If the soap is still quite thin, use the stick blender to mix in the fragrance. If it’s becoming thick, use a whisk to mix it in.

5

Pour a small amount of the soap into the Silicone Column Mold and place the embeds in the center in whatever pattern you like.

6

Pour (or spoon) the soap into the mold in different areas to help the soap surround the embeds easily.

7

Very carefully tap the mold on the counter to get rid of bubbles. Be careful to not tap the mold too hard, or the airlock can break and the mold can pop open. To prevent this, you can clamp the sides of the mold together.



8



Place the mold in the fridge for at least 4 hours. If the soap becomes too hot, it could warp the embeds or the white soap could develop glycerin rivers. Allow the soap to stay in the mold for 1-2 days.



9



Unmold the soap. If the sides of the mold do not peel away easily, give it another day in the mold. Once unmolded, cut the soap into bars. Set them aside while you prepare the nori soap layer.

MAKE THE OUTER LAYER

1

Slowly and carefully add 1 ounce of lye to 2.1 ounces of distilled water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool.

2

In a large glass bowl, combine and melt the 2.1 ounces of coconut oil, 1.4 ounces of rice bran oil, 0.4 ounces of shea butter, 1.1 ounces of sweet almond oil, and 2.1 ounces of palm oil (remember to fully melt then mix your entire container of palm oil before portioning). Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130° F or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend the mixture to a thin trace.

3

Add 1.5 teaspoons dispersed Black Oxide and 1 teaspoon dispersed Green Chrome Oxide Pigment. Use the stick blender to fully mix in the colorants.

4

Continue stick blending until you reach a medium trace that holds a peak

5

Using a brush, apply the black soap to the sides of each bar of soap. Use a combination of dabbing motions and brush strokes to create a textured appearance without a lot of the white soap showing through. Place each soap on a cutting board or sheet of parchment/wax paper to harden and dry.

6

Continue painting each soap until the outside of each is covered. Work somewhat quickly – the soap will continue to harden as it sits. Transfer the leftover soap batter to an individual cavity mold.

7

Allow the outside to harden for about 1-2 days before handling. Allow the soaps to cure for 4-6 weeks and enjoy!

Tutorial credits

Photographer: Amanda Kerzman, Christina Becker

Sushi Soap Project

  • Skill Level: Advanced
  • Time:
  • Yield: About 2 pounds of soap

This project is not for the faint of heart. It’s not particularly difficult, but it does take several batches of soap and a few days to complete. First, several column embeds are created to look like sushi fillings. We used White Melt and Pour Soap Base and Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base to expedite the process, but the embeds can also be made with cold process soap. 

Once the embeds are cool and hard, they are cut into random shapes. The exact shape doesn’t really matter, but they look more natural than a perfect square. For our first attempt at this project, we used a mixture of fresh cold process batter and finely chopped white cold process soap to create a rice texture.

The embeds are inserted into the Mini Star Silicone Column Mold, and white soap is poured around them. After about 1-2 days, the soap can be removed from the mold and cut into different shapes.

The final step is painting cold process soap on the outside of the soap. We used a shaving brush for this step, but any large fluffy paint brush will do the trick. We experimented with painting the entire batch first then cutting, as well as painting the individual bars. We found painting the individual bars a little bit easier – the outer layer tended to crack when we cut the soap after.

It’s a fairly complicated project but we think it’s worth it. We think they’ll be a hit at markets – they’re a great conversation piece. They would also be the perfect gift for any sushi enthusiast in your life.

You will need:

  • Sushi Embeds:
  • our Mini Star Silicone Column Molds
  • 5 oz. LCP White Melt and Pour Soap Base
  • Chrome Green Color Block
  • 11 oz. LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base
  • Chrome Green Color Block
  • Fizzy Lemonade Color Block
  • Perfect Orange Color Block
  • Fired Up Fuchsia Color Block
  • Shimmer Merlot Sparkle Color Block
  • Sushi Base:
  • Silicone Column Mold
  • 6 oz. Coconut Oil (30%)
  • 6 oz. Palm Oil (30%)
  • 4 oz. Rice Bran Oil (20%)
  • 1 oz. Shea Butter (5%)
  • 3 oz. Sweet Almond Oil (15%)
  • 6 oz. Distilled Water
  • 2.8 oz. Sodium Hydroxide Lye
  • 1 oz. Fresh Bamboo Fragrance Oil
  • Titanium Dioxide

  • Sushi Outer Layer:
  • 2.1 oz. Coconut Oil (30%)
  • 2.1 oz. Palm Oil (30%)
  • 1.4 oz. Rice Bran Oil (20%)
  • 0.4 oz. Shea Butter (5%)
  • 1.1 oz. Sweet Almond Oil (15%)
  • 1 oz. Sodium Hydroxide Lye
  • Green Chrome Oxide Pigment
  • Black Oxide Pigment
  • Optional: Shaving Brush

Follow these steps:

MAKE THE EMBEDS

1

Chop 11 ounces of LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base into small uniform pieces. Then, chop 5 ounces of LCP White Melt and Pour Soap Base into small uniform pieces. Add the following amounts of soap base and color blocks to separate heat-safe containers. Melt the soap and color blocks in the microwave separately using 10-20 second bursts.
NOTE: If you have fewer than 4 Mini Square Silicone Column Molds, you’ll need to make the embeds in batches. 

  • Salmon Embed: 3.5 oz. LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base + 0.5 oz. LCP White Soap Base + equal amounts of Perfect Orange Color Block, Fired Up Fuchsia Color Block, and Fizzy Lemonade Color Block + a very small shaving of Shimmer Merlot Sparkle Color Block
  • Orange Embed: 4 oz. LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base + Perfect Orange Color Block shavings
  • Green Embed: 3.5 oz. LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base + 0.5 oz. LCP White Soap Base + equal amounts of Fizzy Lemonade Color Block and Chrome Green Color Block shavings
  • Light Green Embed: 4 oz. LCP White Melt and Pour Soap Base + equal amounts of Fizzy Lemonade Color Block and Chrome Green Color Block shavings

2

After melting one container of soap, immediately pour it into one of the Mini Square Silicone Column Molds. Place the mold into a sturdy and tall container to make sure it stays upright and the soap doesn’t pour out. Repeat until you’ve created all 4 embeds (green, light green, salmon, and orange). Allow the embeds to fully harden and cool for several hours.

3

Remove the embeds from the molds. Trim the sides to create triangles leaving a square center – we like using a Clean Up Tool. Use a sharp, non-serrated knife to cut the corners off the embeds as you see fit. We cut one corner off both green embeds and the salmon embed. Then we cut the orange embed into four equal pieces to look like carrots. Don’t worry too much about how you cut the embeds – the key is not keeping them perfect. Set aside to prep the base.

MAKE THE SUSHI BASE

1

Slowly and carefully add 2.8 ounces of lye to 6 ounces of water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool. If you’d like a harder bar of soap that releases faster from the mold, you can add sodium lactate to the cooled lye water. Use 1 teaspoon of sodium lactate per pound of oils in the recipe. For this recipe, you’d add 1 teaspoon sodium lactate.

2

In a large glass bowl, combine and melt 6 ounces of coconut oil, 4 ounces of rice bran oil, 1 ounce of shea butter, 3 ounces of sweet almond oil, and 6 ounces of palm oil (remember to fully melt then mix your entire container of palm oil before portioning). Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130° F or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend the mixture to a thin trace.

3

Add all of the dispersed titanium dioxide, and use the stick blender to mix in thoroughly.

4

Add the 1 ounce of Fresh Bamboo Fragrance Oil. If the soap is still quite thin, use the stick blender to mix in the fragrance. If it’s becoming thick, use a whisk to mix it in.

5

Pour a small amount of the soap into the Silicone Column Mold and place the embeds in the center in whatever pattern you like.

6

Pour (or spoon) the soap into the mold in different areas to help the soap surround the embeds easily.

7

Very carefully tap the mold on the counter to get rid of bubbles. Be careful to not tap the mold too hard, or the airlock can break and the mold can pop open. To prevent this, you can clamp the sides of the mold together.



8



Place the mold in the fridge for at least 4 hours. If the soap becomes too hot, it could warp the embeds or the white soap could develop glycerin rivers. Allow the soap to stay in the mold for 1-2 days.



9



Unmold the soap. If the sides of the mold do not peel away easily, give it another day in the mold. Once unmolded, cut the soap into bars. Set them aside while you prepare the nori soap layer.

MAKE THE OUTER LAYER

1

Slowly and carefully add 1 ounce of lye to 2.1 ounces of distilled water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool.

2

In a large glass bowl, combine and melt the 2.1 ounces of coconut oil, 1.4 ounces of rice bran oil, 0.4 ounces of shea butter, 1.1 ounces of sweet almond oil, and 2.1 ounces of palm oil (remember to fully melt then mix your entire container of palm oil before portioning). Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130° F or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend the mixture to a thin trace.

3

Add 1.5 teaspoons dispersed Black Oxide and 1 teaspoon dispersed Green Chrome Oxide Pigment. Use the stick blender to fully mix in the colorants.

4

Continue stick blending until you reach a medium trace that holds a peak

5

Using a brush, apply the black soap to the sides of each bar of soap. Use a combination of dabbing motions and brush strokes to create a textured appearance without a lot of the white soap showing through. Place each soap on a cutting board or sheet of parchment/wax paper to harden and dry.

6

Continue painting each soap until the outside of each is covered. Work somewhat quickly – the soap will continue to harden as it sits. Transfer the leftover soap batter to an individual cavity mold.

7

Allow the outside to harden for about 1-2 days before handling. Allow the soaps to cure for 4-6 weeks and enjoy!

Tutorial credits

Photographer: Amanda Kerzman, Christina Becker

You will need:

  • Sushi Embeds:
  • our Mini Star Silicone Column Molds
  • 5 oz. LCP White Melt and Pour Soap Base
  • Chrome Green Color Block
  • 11 oz. LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base
  • Chrome Green Color Block
  • Fizzy Lemonade Color Block
  • Perfect Orange Color Block
  • Fired Up Fuchsia Color Block
  • Shimmer Merlot Sparkle Color Block
  • Sushi Base:
  • Silicone Column Mold
  • 6 oz. Coconut Oil (30%)
  • 6 oz. Palm Oil (30%)
  • 4 oz. Rice Bran Oil (20%)
  • 1 oz. Shea Butter (5%)
  • 3 oz. Sweet Almond Oil (15%)
  • 6 oz. Distilled Water
  • 2.8 oz. Sodium Hydroxide Lye
  • 1 oz. Fresh Bamboo Fragrance Oil
  • Titanium Dioxide

  • Sushi Outer Layer:
  • 2.1 oz. Coconut Oil (30%)
  • 2.1 oz. Palm Oil (30%)
  • 1.4 oz. Rice Bran Oil (20%)
  • 0.4 oz. Shea Butter (5%)
  • 1.1 oz. Sweet Almond Oil (15%)
  • 1 oz. Sodium Hydroxide Lye
  • Green Chrome Oxide Pigment
  • Black Oxide Pigment
  • Optional: Shaving Brush

Follow these steps:

MAKE THE EMBEDS

1

Chop 11 ounces of LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base into small uniform pieces. Then, chop 5 ounces of LCP White Melt and Pour Soap Base into small uniform pieces. Add the following amounts of soap base and color blocks to separate heat-safe containers. Melt the soap and color blocks in the microwave separately using 10-20 second bursts.
NOTE: If you have fewer than 4 Mini Square Silicone Column Molds, you’ll need to make the embeds in batches. 

  • Salmon Embed: 3.5 oz. LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base + 0.5 oz. LCP White Soap Base + equal amounts of Perfect Orange Color Block, Fired Up Fuchsia Color Block, and Fizzy Lemonade Color Block + a very small shaving of Shimmer Merlot Sparkle Color Block
  • Orange Embed: 4 oz. LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base + Perfect Orange Color Block shavings
  • Green Embed: 3.5 oz. LCP Clear Melt and Pour Soap Base + 0.5 oz. LCP White Soap Base + equal amounts of Fizzy Lemonade Color Block and Chrome Green Color Block shavings
  • Light Green Embed: 4 oz. LCP White Melt and Pour Soap Base + equal amounts of Fizzy Lemonade Color Block and Chrome Green Color Block shavings

2

After melting one container of soap, immediately pour it into one of the Mini Square Silicone Column Molds. Place the mold into a sturdy and tall container to make sure it stays upright and the soap doesn’t pour out. Repeat until you’ve created all 4 embeds (green, light green, salmon, and orange). Allow the embeds to fully harden and cool for several hours.

3

Remove the embeds from the molds. Trim the sides to create triangles leaving a square center – we like using a Clean Up Tool. Use a sharp, non-serrated knife to cut the corners off the embeds as you see fit. We cut one corner off both green embeds and the salmon embed. Then we cut the orange embed into four equal pieces to look like carrots. Don’t worry too much about how you cut the embeds – the key is not keeping them perfect. Set aside to prep the base.

MAKE THE SUSHI BASE

1

Slowly and carefully add 2.8 ounces of lye to 6 ounces of water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool. If you’d like a harder bar of soap that releases faster from the mold, you can add sodium lactate to the cooled lye water. Use 1 teaspoon of sodium lactate per pound of oils in the recipe. For this recipe, you’d add 1 teaspoon sodium lactate.

2

In a large glass bowl, combine and melt 6 ounces of coconut oil, 4 ounces of rice bran oil, 1 ounce of shea butter, 3 ounces of sweet almond oil, and 6 ounces of palm oil (remember to fully melt then mix your entire container of palm oil before portioning). Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130° F or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend the mixture to a thin trace.

3

Add all of the dispersed titanium dioxide, and use the stick blender to mix in thoroughly.

4

Add the 1 ounce of Fresh Bamboo Fragrance Oil. If the soap is still quite thin, use the stick blender to mix in the fragrance. If it’s becoming thick, use a whisk to mix it in.

5

Pour a small amount of the soap into the Silicone Column Mold and place the embeds in the center in whatever pattern you like.

6

Pour (or spoon) the soap into the mold in different areas to help the soap surround the embeds easily.

7

Very carefully tap the mold on the counter to get rid of bubbles. Be careful to not tap the mold too hard, or the airlock can break and the mold can pop open. To prevent this, you can clamp the sides of the mold together.



8



Place the mold in the fridge for at least 4 hours. If the soap becomes too hot, it could warp the embeds or the white soap could develop glycerin rivers. Allow the soap to stay in the mold for 1-2 days.



9



Unmold the soap. If the sides of the mold do not peel away easily, give it another day in the mold. Once unmolded, cut the soap into bars. Set them aside while you prepare the nori soap layer.

MAKE THE OUTER LAYER

1

Slowly and carefully add 1 ounce of lye to 2.1 ounces of distilled water and gently stir until the lye has fully dissolved and the liquid is clear. Set aside to cool.

2

In a large glass bowl, combine and melt the 2.1 ounces of coconut oil, 1.4 ounces of rice bran oil, 0.4 ounces of shea butter, 1.1 ounces of sweet almond oil, and 2.1 ounces of palm oil (remember to fully melt then mix your entire container of palm oil before portioning). Once the lye water and the oils have cooled to 130° F or below (and are ideally within 10 degrees of each other), add the lye water to the oils and stick blend the mixture to a thin trace.

3

Add 1.5 teaspoons dispersed Black Oxide and 1 teaspoon dispersed Green Chrome Oxide Pigment. Use the stick blender to fully mix in the colorants.

4

Continue stick blending until you reach a medium trace that holds a peak

5

Using a brush, apply the black soap to the sides of each bar of soap. Use a combination of dabbing motions and brush strokes to create a textured appearance without a lot of the white soap showing through. Place each soap on a cutting board or sheet of parchment/wax paper to harden and dry.

6

Continue painting each soap until the outside of each is covered. Work somewhat quickly – the soap will continue to harden as it sits. Transfer the leftover soap batter to an individual cavity mold.

7

Allow the outside to harden for about 1-2 days before handling. Allow the soaps to cure for 4-6 weeks and enjoy!

Tutorial credits

Photographer: Amanda Kerzman, Christina Becker

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